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As a foreign organization filing patents in Canada there is information regarding trademarks, patents, and industrial design that is vital to the success of  your filing.

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FAQ - Canadian Patent System

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Due date for PCT national phase entry into Canada
Up to 30 months from the priority date, or up to 42 months from the priority date if accompanied by a late fee

Minimum requirements for national phase entry
1. Identification of the PCT application for which national phase entry is requested
2. A copy of the PCT application if national phase entry is requested before the PCT application has been published
3. A translation of the PCT application into English or French if it was filed in another language
4. Any applicable government feesThere are no documents that are necessary to be signed by the applicant in order to meet the requirements for a Canadian national phase entry or direct patent or industrial design filing.

Grace period for disclosure of invention
Canada provides a grace period of 12 months from a non-confidential disclosure of the invention in Canada or elsewhere by the applicant or by someone who obtained knowledge of the invention directly or indirectly from the applicant. It is NOT sufficient for the Canadian application to have a priority date that falls within the 12 month grace period. The Canadian or PCT filing date must be within 12 months of the disclosure of the invention.

Examination
Examination of patent applications is not automatic; it must be requested anytime within 5 years from the Canadian filing date (or from the PCT filing date).

Reinstatement of an abandoned application
An applicant can reinstate an abandoned patent application within 12 months of abandonment by taking whatever action was missed and by payment of a reinstatement fee. There is no requirement to provide the patent office with an explanation of the reason for abandonment.  There is no reinstatement for an application abandoned for more than 12 months.

Term
The term of a Canadian patent is 20 years from the date of filing (or from the date of filing of the corresponding PCT application).  The term of a Canadian industrial design is 10 years from the date it is granted by the patent office. 

Maintenance fees
Maintenance fees are payable yearly on Canadian patent applications and patents, starting from the 2nd anniversary of the PCT filing date (or of the Canadian filing date if the application is not a national phase entry from a PCT application).  

Yearly maintenance fees are not payable on Canadian industrial designs or applications, however a single renewal fee is payable 5 years from the grant of a design in order to maintain the design in force for the final 5 years of its 10 year term. 

First-to-file
The Canadian patent office operates on a ‘first-to-file’ basis, as in other countries.

Madrid Protocol
Canada is not a signatory to the Madrid Protocol.  However, a Canadian trade-mark may be filed under the Paris Convention claiming priority to a foreign trade-mark filing, if filed within six months of the earliest foreign filing. 

Filing based on use/proposed use
An application can be filed based on proposed use if there has not yet been use of the mark in Canada.  If the mark has been used in Canada, the date of first use must be provided in the application. 

No Nice classification
Canada does not operate using the Nice classification system.  A trade-mark is filed specifying the wares and/or services for which use has been established in Canada or for which use is intended.

Foreign use and registration as basis for registration in Canada
A Canadian application or registration of a trade-mark may be based on registration/application for registration of the trade-mark in a foreign country and use of the trade-mark in that country.  The applicant is not required to claim use of the trade-mark in Canada when filing on this basis.

Clearly descriptive marks
Clearly descriptive marks are not registrable in Canada unless they can be shown to have ‘acquired distinctiveness’ in Canada or to be ‘not without distinctive character’ for marks registered in the applicant’s country of origin. 

Term of trade-mark registration
A Canadian trade-mark registration is valid for 15 years and may be extended indefinitely upon payment of renewal fees.  

Canadian Patent Act – The laws governing patents in Canada

Canadian Patent Rules – The rules that further define the laws set out in the Patent Act

Manual of Patent Office Practice – These are the practices followed by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office when examining patent applications

Canadian Intellectual Property Office patent database – Search patents and published patent applications

Canadian Industrial Designs Act – The laws governing industrial designs in Canada

Canadian Industrial Designs Rules – The rules that further define the laws set out in the Industrial Designs Act

Manual of Design Office Practice – These are the practices followed by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office when examining industrial design applications

Canadian Intellectual Property Office industrial designs database – Search industrial designs

Canadian Trade-marks Act - The laws governing trade-marks in Canada    

Canadian Trade-marks Rules - The rules that further define the laws set out in the Trade-marks Act    

Canadian Trade-marks Office Practices – The practices followed by the Canadian Intellectual Property Office when examining trade-mark applications    

Small Entity Declaration Tool

Canadian Intellectual Property Office trade-marks database – Search trade-marks